About your Search

20121128
20121206
STATION
CNBC 12
KCSM (PBS) 3
CSPAN2 2
CSPAN 1
FBC 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 21
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
the demonstration. the protesters say the copper mine is damaging the environment. myanmar's decision to use force is likely to cause alarm among western nations who have praised its democratic reforms. and so why did the government pretsz ahead with the crackdown? well, nhk world's jun kobayashi reports from yangon. >> reporter: the crowd included local buddhist monks. the demonstrators demanded a halt to mining operations in central myanmar. local officials say at least 70 people were injured. the protests began in mid-november. local residents say they were forced from their homes. they say the mine is polluting the environment. president thein sein stressed the crackdown. he issued a statement saying the protest were broken up according to the law. the largest opposition leader aung san suu kyi went to the site on thursday night. she called on both sides to seek settlement. >> translator: i want to solve this problem peacefully and in a dignified manner. i want to request that all of you help me on this. >> reporter: the copper mine is being jointly developed by chinese company and the firm li
the copper mine is damaging the environment. myanmar's decision to use force is likely to cause alarm among western nations who have praised its democratic reforms. and so why did the government press ahead with the crackdown? well, nhk world's jun kobayashi reports from yangon. >> reporter: since thursday, they've disbursed hundreds of protesters. the crowd included local residents and buddhist monks. the demonstrators demanded a halt to mining operations in central myanmar. local officials say at least 70 people were injured. the protests began in mid-november. local residents say they were forced from their homes. they say the mine is polluting the environment. president thein sein has stressed the legitimacy of the crackdown. he issued a statement saying the protests were unauthorized and broken up according to the law. the largest opposition leader aung san suu kyi rushed to the site on thursday night. she called on both sides to seek a negotiated settlement. >> translator: i want to solve this problem peacefully and in a dignified manner. i want to request that all of you help me on t
to help them deal with the effects of climate change. in the coming days, it will be up to environment ministers to thrash out these and other points. >> certain points can only be resolved by the ministers themselves. providing financial support to poorer countries, for example. how much are we willing to do by 2020 to protect the environment? >> scientists say climate change is happening much faster than previously thought. the evidence, such as spermatic pmelting of -- the dramatic melting of sea ice, is mounting. >> the eu is at its strongest when we had all 27 countries on board, supporting the same goal. we need to keep at it. >> officials are now making the final preparations before the ministerial-level talks begin. critics say too much time has been wasted. now the pressure is on for leaders to take a more cooperative approach. in a prince william and his wife, the duchess of cambridge, are expecting a baby. that is, better known as kate middleton. pimm she was admitted to hospital with acute morning sickness -- and she was admitted to hospital with a cute morning sickness. th
. as more do, it will create an environment for us to reach an agreement. we need the same willingness to step 4 on the left to be able to meet in this room at the table or wherever the room maybe and to come to an agreement that will lead us forward. one thing i am hoping for is if we can reach an agreement, in principle before the end of the year, then implement it, i believe this is what many have been waiting for to launch a more spirited recovery. if we get this done, if we have a credible $4 trillion deficit reduction plan signed and sealed, signed by the president, what does that say to the rest of the world? many economies in europe and other places are struggling, but ours will be the strongest in the world in terms of the future. it takes a lot of hard work but it is worth the effort. all will prosper. saturday night, my wife and i went to see a movie by spielberg. about another gentleman who lived in illinois for a while named abraham lincoln. toward the end of the movie, daniel day-lewis was sitting across from confederates and there was talk about what the war was all abou
was trying to do, i believe, was set the agenda and create an environment so that he could win politically and set up after the quote, a rare weekend session in the senate where he had two votes, no republican amendments allowed, and he set this up to show that republicans were obstructionists, and that they would not go along with what he said was good for the country, and this was a public relations ploy designed to shift attention from the democrats inability to come along with what republicans wanted to do, which is fine, their prerogative k to republicans saying we don't want to go along with what the democratsment to do. in short, he was seeking to control the agenda, and i think that's the real issue here. certainly, there are times when minorities of both parties obstruct the majority because they need to or want to, but the real issue is one of agenda control. if you -- we actually have a way to think about this, you know, in political science, and, you know, norm knows more than i do, but look at house majority parties, hey, that tells us a lot how they behave today. they try to
by the environment minister. >> and it should clear the way for talks on a final storage site for germany's nuclear waste. politicians hope to reach across party consensus before the next elections. >> plans to exploit the potential for a permanent nuclear waste storage facility have been put on hold until after the lower saxony state elections in january. politicians hope the delay will aid the search for a storage solution all parties support. >> there will be no more exploration of the site until after the election. my goal is to discontinue the work there for good. instead, we should come up with plans for a nationwide storage facility which all the parties can agree on. >> he hopes to push through legislation before next easter that would fund an open-ended search for a new storage facility. opposition parties previously called for talks to be postponed. now they are expressing willingness to cooperate. >> we are looking for a solution, and this is the sensible thing to do rather than turning it into a political campaign issue. we also need to be wary of false information. but if the talks fai
legalized by a number of regions. even the spanish environment ministry is backing the move, hoping to see a rise in takings in national parks as a result of people buying hunting permits, but animal rights activists are far from happy, calling the horseback hunting savage. >> this is a story from spain about wild boars and a controversial method of hunting them. but it is also a story about a country in crisis and how one is sacrificed for the good of the other. this is a member of the old gentry. hunting has been in his family's blood for generations. he is helping revive the tradition of hunting wild boar on horseback with spears. the sport, known as pigsticking, was long banned, but he has legalize it again. as chairman of the pigsticking international club, he wants to use the hunt as a way to draw tourists to the region. hunters pay at least 5000 euros per team to take part, money the locals could really use, so he prays to god to save spain and give people jobs. >> in our region, this really could be a way out of the crisis. we hope to get customers from abroad interested in the hun
, that's a target-rich environment is what we refer to california. they raise taxes again. they sent the message that the unions are going to continue to control the process out there. they defeated proposition 32. they passed proposition 30 which was the increase in their taxes. so, california businessmen and women are looking at their bottom line saying, where are we going to go? other places? >> governor, is it too much of a leap to say when we do this at the federal level they leave the country, bilss can eventually leave the country. >> sure. >> but we can't seem to make the leap to say that. and i'm talking about the fiscal cliff now. i wonder if you were at 25% of gdp, if the government had grown to this size where it is right now and you were trying to figure out how to deal with it and you were in charge, would it be all about -- would the first thing you come up with be raising taxes? would not -- wouldn't you address the spending -- wouldn't you address the spending side of -- >> right. >> -- and, you know, the republicans are trying to criticize the obama proposals by say
, the ryan airs, who continue to take market share and operate in a more difficult economic environment much more so than the flag carriers. however starting to look at the flag carriers again, in particular lufthansa. the iberian side of it will drag earnings down for quite a long time. air france still has significant employment issues. and if you're looking for a relatively undervalued, company which is taking itself and do significant cost cutting which i think it will bring through, you have conglomerate discounted lufthansa. it makes it a more interesting stock. >> at a time when europe doesn't have a lot of demand strength, if we're talking about reducing capacity, that means higher ticket prices and perhaps germany being one place where businesses can afford to pay up. >> i think that it's an element of probably relatively small part of overall. these are global businesses. they need to have global growth. but that is an interesting point for next year. >>'s most important for global demand then? >> with airlines it's about oil prices, in terms of capacity and reduced capacity. and i
. at least we see a deterioration in either the global environment or at least we see domestic growth really fall off from here. as the rba made the point and one that we agree with is that there's still time for these rate cuts which we've had delivered to pass through to the economy itself. we know monetary policy takes between one and two years to have an effect. >> what if on the contrary we get better growth out of china and we see commodity prices go up again and now when we've already had all these rate cuts, is there a risk then to inflation for the country? >> i think there is. that was one thing that the rba pointed to in the november statement, then worried that underlying inflation had ticked up towards the middle of the 2% to 3% target. i think from here, if we do get a scenario like that where the u.s. fiscal issues are resolved, i think the statement the rb after the has given us today probably puts them in a good position to be able to move policy higher if they have to next year in response to higher inflation. >> so what happens to the aussie dollar now? >> well, as i said,
that environment look like? >> i don't think that's what happens. we're not talking about taking tax rates from 35 to 50 or 60. we're talking a few percentage points. so it's uncertainty, well do i get my deductions, do i pay a hayer rate? what is my mix and until then i sit on my hands. bringing up the again the uncertainty factor. i think we get to a point where we get some sort of compromise around these things. we'll get back through a muddle through economy. not a great one but good enough one. david: the president's comments of last year notwithstanding where he was for lowering rates. rates go up in one way, shape or form. rather than spending money in the stock market where people get taxed more they think of more direct investment? more vehicles that avoid the stock market entirely and get cash directly to the companies? >> that could happen and would be good for the economy which in a perverse way would be good for the stock market as well if you see my logic. getting people to move off the dime. to say i don't need this hoard of cash frankly earning almost nothing. i need to put it to w
remember to put money to work. in an environment where not people put money to work and people aren't doing anything, you get an influx of retail money. you have to commit that money to your retirement and to your kids. >> interesting. >> it's a big difference. >> btig has a note on seasonality regarding the end of the year and even december '08 was positive. how resilient the month of december is. >> funny you mention that. that was such a false tell. we thought maybe things had bottomed and then just off a cliff, not fiscal but stock right after that. it's a great note. >> meantime, as we await the opening bell this morning, we'll look at the s&p 500 at the realtime exchange on the top of your screen. big board here. >> there's the bell over at the nasdaq today, sears holdings and st. jude's children's research hospital celebrating the st. jude thanks and giving campaign. lead story involves delta and talks they say to acquire from singapore some stakes in virgin atlanta. >> we'll see what happens. they have been active. the one people are more focused on is american airlines in bankruptc
if you go over the cliff and given how tenuous this economic environment is right now, the message it sends to business leaders, employers, this place is not only ungovern ner rabl, it's dysfunction among dysfunction. >> freand of mine, a liberal, said if you think they are going to trust you after you my the january 1st deadline, do you think they will trust you that week? if you can't meet your own deadline, why should they make anybody else's? >> and the markets are pricing in a solution. you see it really quite clearly. >> and somebody was on -- mcmahon was wrong. there are grownups jared bernsteinรง and chris, thank yo. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. if you're a man with low testosterone, you should know
. as far as the environment energy, it's an absolute winner. but we have to do it with the least amount of subsidy and god forbid there should be a prophet in operations that we could actually achieve that if we work together. so let's take the report together. first of all, the board of directors had organizational problems from very top of the board. i was very pleased for sitting this hearing and i ask questions before. we went to a nine-member board and seven members of the board had been appointed. two democrat appointees were lacking until yesterday the white house admitted these two and i'm pleased to see that and i hope everyone helps get the full complement of the board in place. sometimes it takes a hearing to get action under its implementation of a strategic plan for highlighting that the board should be filled. and maybe they did that at their own volition, but i'm very pleased that it was done. let's look at the key folks in place and you divided into six divisions. i'm very pleased to hear what she said about possibly not going forward with some of the commuter activities
left, let's talk about the current environment. what are you hearing from a lot of the senior executives that are asking for your advice or if you're in a board room or chatting with them especially in terms of the fiscal cliff and concern about making big decisions or lack thereof and not putting money at it. >> the interesting part is talk about the fiscal cliff is the talk about the talk about the fiscal cliff. i don't think people are as concerned as the level of chatter that goes around. i think the chatter is more than the concern. the fiscal cliff just happens to be a preset deal on a scale of one to ten. it's a deal that is possible as outcome. i think what the country should hope for is that we come up with a better deal. business wants the rules. i understand why business is very much do a deal. do a something. because a business then can make their plans around that. if a marginal tax rate goes up too high here, they'll put a plant somewhere else. you can make those decisions. they want to know the rules. >> know the rules of the road. >> there's an america out ther
environments, a whole host of reforms that need to be undertaken. i think the government is starting to make moves in this direction, which is good. but these reforms have been taking a long time to take hold. and we're not going to see an immediate difference. >> how much does brazil suffer if the fact that argentina is itself suffering so much? is there a lack of potential opportunity maybe in the export markets for some of its neighbors that is part of the issue? >> there's part of the issue. ironically, i think argentina suffers more from the fact that brazil has been basically flat lining the past 12 months and that's exacerbated problems in argentina's own growth model. brazil is not so particular an open economy. it only exports around 15% of gdp. so it's not a very open economy. and actually, a lot of these problems are more domestic than they are external. >> that's a fascinating point. i want to come back to you in a second. in egypt, tens of thousands have taken to the streets of cairo last night to protest against the decree by the egyptian president mohamed morsi that grants him
the united states capable of holding the 166 detainees who remain in guantanamo in an environment that meets the security requirements. you're saying the same thing but it is, it is the legal basis you have to figure out now. there is this prison talked about in illinois. i'm not sure whether that is going forward. whether it is stuck in the mud at the moment. a practical application for what you're suggesting, perhaps, at some point, some day, we find those who are responsible for killing our u.s. ambassador in benghazi, libya. if we get those people, where do we take them? >> well there's the question. what are the rules? would the department of justice say? what would the bureau of prisons say? all this still needs to be worked out. gitmo is over 10 years old. it will be 11 in january. and we're still, we still don't have those kinds of things. we could have been talking about that for years, especially, i remember when the president signed the gitmo closure order. he started signing it and somebody asked him where are we going to put these people when you close it and he stopped signing
. they could greatly benefit first maintaining a growth friendly business environment, and they could greatly benefit from reinventing their production structure, upgrading quality, and redistricting their exports towards strongly growing markets. innovation is crucial in this respect. this means for a start that where profit margins are restored, they should serve to fund research and development to higher extent. but innovation potential is not always translated into actual marketable employment creating and growth sustaining innovation. what is key in translating potential is the regime of economic incentives. and it is indeed this system of economic incentives that the current waiver of structural reforms in the euro area is addressing. central challenge is to set conditions so that the skills of the labor force especially of our young people can be profitably employed in competitive firms or in the new enterprises that will go on to set up. in this vain, removing rigidity clearly races the potential for growth and job creation. and this of course, the resumption of growth, is fundamental
that are on average 11.1 years of age that are really driving car sales. in this low interest rate environment, this is the other big ticket item. >> how are people going to fund their purchases? you have an 11-year-old car, how are they funding the replacement of it? >> well, the availability of credit has improved dramatically over the last eight months or so. and we're even seeing people with bumps in their credit history, subprime borrowers, getting more acceptances of their car loans. and of course there are a lot of incentivized interest rates from the manufacturer's financing arms out there, as well. the overall softness in the european market and with japan in recession, we think we'll see likely more incentives from manufacture are ers for customer the coming months because they have capacity they're not using for those other market. so they will be targeting this u.s. market and the consumer is in a pretty good mood. part of that we believe is the stabilization of home prices which is the basic net egg for most middle class americans. >> it would seem whatever's going on where you ar
'll get. >> you know what, i think the environment, as you look out to next year, is really difficult, ross. i mean, you don't really know what is going to come out of the u.s. fiscal cliff, how damaging potentially that can be to u.s. confidence, u.s. activity. things seem to be holding up fairly well in china. but i think there is still going to be some concerns about the whole performance of the asian economy and whether that can actually pick up next year. and then, of course, in the eurozone itself, we seem to be mending the problems progressively and taking out the tail risks, which i think is good and that is the bottom line that investors should take going further forward, but at the same time, there are some elements that you can have. if you do a forecast, in a way you could come up with something like 1% quotes for next year, but at the same time, you have to be conscious that we've had such a battery of downside impact, downside negative news coming through really for all economists in the western world in the last few years. you have to be very cognizant of those. >> i th
environment again and really if you look at the economy, we're probably going back to the '90 style economy where you had 3%, 3.5% was really good growth. 2% growth which we're experiencing right now is pretty good. full employment might be 5.5, 6% like the old days. and i think with that being said, we've got to to get a little bit closer to those numbers to really have the economy start to take off. and i don't think we're that far in there. >> any much those numbers we would take. i don't know whether we are or not. wishful thinking for cantor. certainly would help you guys. why didn't you like fighting irish? >> they were on tv every week when i was a child and i'd like to see alabama win. >> alabama won last year. >> that's okay. all right. thank you. see you later. >>> in fact in some of the squawk sports news this morning, dallas beating philadelphia in sunday night nfl game. 38-33. tony romo threw three touchdown passes to break troy aikman's career franchise record. and the jets beat the cardinals 7-6. new york scoring the lone touchdown after mark sanchez was benched with tim tebo
there and getting that business to a level of sustainability given the very competitive environment. and in asia-pacific, it's all about all the seeds we've planted in terms of investments and plants and products, those are going to bear a lot of fruit in terms of volumes and revenues as we grow that business going forward. >> we've done probably five of six interviews, not just the auto market, but the economy as a whole, and seems like the same question over and over, are you seeing stability? and any time i talk with you or other auto executives, yes, we think we're seeing stabilization. do you have confidence that europe has stabilized? >> i can't give you 100% pure confidence. we're seeing some encouraging signals even in the last couple of days in terms of some of the sovereign debt issues they're trying to resolve. but our approach there is -- as you know, we've announced a transformation plan there, it's about investing in products. but at the same time, work on the cost side and that's why we've made announcements around some equipment changes. >> real quick, here in the u.s., consumer
mexican food. we bring a whole level of energy to the environment and we bring things that the competition don't bring. and we are -- we are providing a dining opportunity for families that they can't get anywhere else. >> one question. do you -- you get pressure on your menu in terms of this -- american diet fad that's going on? have you changed your menu over time to be -- somewhat responsive to that need? >> we are doing that kind of behind-the-scenes. tony la russaed sodium across our menu last year by 50%. it is not something we advertise. we have. we have calories on our men use in new york. and so we are prepared to take a leading role on that. and -- >> i know what i'm getting into, paul. please don't. if i come in there, i know what i want. don't give me something i don't want. >> that's the great thing about our concept is you can come into moe's and have a great healthy, even vegetarian meal -- >> that's not what i want. >> or you can get a 20-ounce home wreck their will satisfy you for the rest of the day. >> all right. >> paul, come back again and bring more samples. thanks ve
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)